Kiwi release

March 13, 2018

It’s 3.39am and as I lie here awake (yet again), I am listening to the call of a male Little Spotted Kiwi here at Shakespear Park. How do I know it’s a male? Because I used Mr Google to look up the call of the little spotted kiwi and listened to the male and female calls with my headphones on, then removing the headphones to listen to the call, then headphones back on again to confirm it was exactly what I was hearing.

Last weekend another 20 kiwi were released into the park and again we were invited along to witness the event, however this time we were to have a little bit of involvement. And this time last year we were fortunate enough to be invited to the release of 20 kiwi into the Shakespear Open Sanctuary it was a very special and moving event which you can read about here.

The crowds gathered; invited guests, representatives of iwi, Navy, SOSSI, council and interested groups were present. Earlier we had assisted putting up the marquees and setting out the chairs as well as helping with the portioning of all the afternoon tea cakes and slices to accompany a cuppa later in the afternoon. We arrived to watch the ceremony and took our place at the back of the crowd.

However, we were not there for long before being asked if we would like to participate in the event by carrying out the kiwi in their boxes and then return them to their handlers. Of course we jumped at the chance to be part of this special event.

That meant that I was unable to take many photos so the only ones I have are ones that others have taken.

that’s Roy at the back of the procession (I’m on the other side of him) with Pat & Sue just in front of us.

These kiwi are the little spotted kiwi, there are not many of them on mainland New Zealand with half of theses kiwi coming from Kapiti Island near Wellington and the rest from Tiritiri Matangi Island just off Auckland.

The kiwi were welcomed onto the site by dignitaries

Speeches were made, Karakia sung, before we had to pick up our charges and return them to their quiet zone where a few of them were introduced to the crowds by their handlers.

our charges…Waikawhia and Hugh or better known by their monitored tracking numbers 53 and 63.

Ginny, one of the volunteer trained handlers, getting up close to a kiwi.

Kiwi were later quietly released around the park where they will hopefully breed and flourish. I look forward to many more nighttime calls.


Back in New Zealand

March 9, 2018

After a couple of good nights sleep we were ready to head down to Kopu to pick up the van. It had been having a bit of TLC whilst we were away with some R&M done with Matt and the excellent crew at Autotech. The van was all ready for us and on a quick inspection of repairs done we were soon on our way back to Auckland where we headed for Ardmore Airport as we would be parked there for the next few days. However, those plans were soon to change.

Roy back at the wheel

The fridge and pantry needed restocking as well as the task of unpacking and sorting out wardrobes ie. put away all the winter clothing particularly as on our return Auckland was putting on its finest weather of high temperatures and energy sapping humidity. There were also appointments to be kept with doctors and specialists which required a bit of planning and tripping across the city. Both Roy and Antony had returned home with some sort of flu virus with Roy ending up with pneumonia, for the next few days he was pretty well bed bound.

But hello, we have another problem that we thought had been resolved before we ventured off on holiday, the fridge was not working and in this heat milk was turning into yoghurt overnight! Any food purchases were kept to a minimum and most of our meals we were having at Antony’s place whilst both he and a Roy recouperated. After making lots of calls to try and sort out the fridge problem, as well as making sure that the previous repairs were still under warranty from both the repairer and the manufacturer and with lots of advice from some “experts” at Ardmore, we eventually upsticks and headed over to see Peter at RVRepairs in Gelnfield. Peter quickly had us on our way after a simple fix, so we then continued northwards to return to Shakespear Park.

on the motorway/carpark!

Whilst we have been on holiday, Pat & Sue have taken over our duties as camp hosts for the summer. Oh it was so nice to be back at the beach, parked on grass and of course great to see lots of familiar faces – Rangers, Volunteers and campers alike welcomed us home like long lost friends.

We settled into our usual routines back at the camp with lots of catching up with friends and family over the past few weeks (which will be the subject of another blog entry), and we have kept ourselves very busy what with one thing and another.

With the beginning of the school year the past few weeks has seen the camp being taken over by lots of school groups so we have decamped into the Self Contained Parking area for the interim but still do our duties from there and keep a watchful eye over the rest of the park. We shall probably stay here for the next week or two as there are more school groups booked in over the coming weeks and it seems stilly to keep moving in and out.

that’s a school group enjoying the water with sailing, paddle boarding and kayaking

and that’s the Navy boys on diving exercises off the beach. They also were in doing night diving exercises some evenings as well.

Our plans at this stage are a little up in the air as Roy starts a course of radiation treatment soon so we have to sort out dates and where we shall base ourselves. And the other news? Well, I am off to see the specialist next week to see about my knees….eeeeekkkk! I have managed to defer having replacements done for 10years now but the time has come where I cannot handle the pain, discomfort nor the lack of being able to stand or walk for any length of time before my knee collapses. Watch this space for what comes next.


March 3, 2018

There were emotional farewells at Heathrow, it does not get any easier to say farewell no matter how many times we experience it however with tissues deployed we were soon on the plane ready for our journey home. This time we were breaking the journey with a three night stop over in Singapore.

We were met at Changi Airport by our driver who took us into the city and our hotel, giving us a great running commentary along the way pointing out interesting views, buildings and facts.

first glimpse of the Singapore Wheel and Marina Bay Sands

Along one section of road he pointed out that the road was in fact very straight, had we noticed this? No, we hadn’t, then he pointed out that the median barrier between the dual carriageway were in fact large planters, which are in fact removable. It turns out that Lim Chu Kang Road can be used as an emergency runway if required in case of disaster. The large trees lining each side of the 6km motorway can be removed, as can lamp posts as well as the centre planters by the Army in hours to create a large runway. It was used in 2016 as part of a military exercise and as a practise.

Now that is clever.

After settling into our hotel, we found our way to one of the many hawker markets for a bite to eat before heading back for a good nights sleep.

The following morning we were off and out for a tour around the city taking in some of the many highlights and attractions.

the famous Raffles Hotel, closed and completely covered whilst major renovations are undertaken so no Singapore Sling here for us this time.

looking across to the Marina Bay Sands shopping and hotel complex with its rooftop gardens and pools and the lotus flower shaped building in the foreground.

and to prove I was there.

a selection of interesting sculptures on the road sides

plant covered sculpture to hide these vents

this one shows the vent, which is for underground parking, with the plants just starting to climb up the framework.

Next was a visit to the National Orchid Garden with its impressive collection of orchids, I’ll let the pictures tell the story

Then it was off to see the Merlion, the National symbol of Singapore, it’s a mythical creature with a lion’s head and the body of a fish.

To prove that our selfie skills are not getting any better

There was visits to markets, Chinatown, and Little India where we neglected to take photos, and also a visit to Changi Prison to the museum located there. This required a trip on the MRT, Singapore’s excellent (and cheap) train and underground.

Changi prison was built in the mid 1930’s by the British and was designed to house around 600 prisoners. However, during the Second World War the Japanese took control of the island and prison. Following the fall of Singapore in February 1942, the Japanese military detained about 3,000 civilians in Changi Prison. The Japanese used the British Army’s Selarang Barracks, near the prison, as a POW camp, holding some 50,000 Allied soldiers, predominantly British and Australian; and from 1943, Dutch civilians brought over by the Japanese from the islands in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia). POWs were in fact rarely, if ever, held in the civilian prison. Nevertheless, in the UK, Australia, The Netherlands and elsewhere, the name “Changi” became synonymous with the infamous POW camp nearby.

Photography is not allowed at the museum and prison area.

Back at our hotel, these impressive glass art works were displayed in the lobby

Soon enough our time in Singapore came to an end, and to be honest, we just wanted to get home. Our flight home was uneventful and we arrived in the early hours of the morning NZ time, where Antony was waiting to pick us up. Although he had left London a day after us he took a more direct route home and arrived the day before us.

It was nice to be back in NZ again after our four months away. Looking back we did manage to pack a fair bit into our time away and we can now look forward to planning the next trip.


Farewells and other bits

February 26, 2018

Our farewell dinner with Ian’s family was held at a local Vietnamese Restaurant. We have been warmly enveloped by the Denny family and we were looking forward to getting together with them again. There were Ian’s parents Barry & Christine, his two brothers Matt and Mike, and his cousin Julie & Brian. They are all so easy going and fun to get along with, we were assured of a great evening.

Back row: Matt, Ian, Antony, Alex, Mike

Front row: Chris, Bernice, Julie, Barry, Brian, Roy

Let’s just say that the food was great, the drinks flowed and the Sambucca shots that seemed to keep coming at the end of the evening made for a fun end to the night!

Matt channeling his inner Vietnamese.

They all decided that Christmas 2019 would definitely be celebrated in New Zealand with all wanting to experience a totally different type of climate for the festive season. They are all saving madly in anticipation of their big adventure to the antipodes.

We didn’t always go out together as a family, Ants and Alex met up in town on a few occasions and then we would get some random collection of photos to let us know they were having a good time.

these two out for cocktails and silly indoor golf!

or I get random photos of…guess what we are having for dinner?

And it’s not all gourmet food…..check out this one that Antony and Ian sent to us when they were left home alone after having been at the football all day!

who knew that there was such a thing as “chicken dinosaurs”? Let’s just say that boys will be boys and will do anything to get a reaction out of Mum!

A lot of cooking was done at home over the time we spent in London with Alex doing a bit of baking as well. One day she decided to make Neenish Tarts, just like Grandma used to make. For those of you who don’t know what these are they are a sweet pastry base with a creamy lemony filling and iced with half chocolate and half white icing. They are an antipodean delight and one of my favourites. I can attest that Alex’s version were fabulous and every bit as good as her Grandmas.

Alex channeling her inner grandma!

We also went along to watch Alex play netball on numerous occasions, wrapping up against the biting cold and at times it was not at all pleasant and I hankered for NZ summer weather…..but now we are back and in the searing heat wave and humidity we are experiencing I can now confess that I am hankering for those chilly days where we can rug up against the cold, enjoy a hot toddy or two and cheer from the side lines. Her team mates made us feel very welcome and we even enjoyed the odd night out with them too. Oh and yes, you guessed it, I didn’t take one picture at the netball!

Our last few days were all a bit of a whirl, with us all pretending that our departure date was not imminent.

Then comes those dreaded goodbyes, they don’t come any easier and even though we have plans for future meet ups to look forward to, it does not make it any the less emotional. All in all, we have all had a great time creating lots of wonderful memories.


Catching up and a show or two

February 19, 2018

Yes, I know, we have been slack since we have been home but there has been lots to do. I am now trying to catch up on a number of blog posts to get us up to date so be prepared to be inundated over the next week or so.

Our final week in London, and where has the time flown? which means we need to get into gear and tick off a few things which includes going to see a couple more shows. Our first choice was to see the Book of Mormon, we managed to get matinee tickets during the week and as Ian & Alex had already seen the show it was just Roy, Antony and I that headed off into Piccadilly Circus for the afternoons performance.

The Book of Mormon is a musical comedy about two young Mormon missionaries who travel to Uganda to preach the Mormon religion. The play satirises various Mormon/religious beliefs and practices, it’s irreverent, rude and at times bordering on crude, funny, thought provoking, and all in all a damn good show.

The show was written by the creators of SouthPark with the music and lyrics by the writer of Avenue Q – which we saw here in London on our last visit. It was a fantastic cast as well with some amazing performances.

Afterwards, we met Alex from work for a cocktail before we found somewhere to go for dinner. Antony impressed with my selfie-taking skills NOT!

After dinner on our way to the train station we passed a theatre with searchlights casting their beams along the front of the high rise buildings, security people were everywhere, and an air of something happening, what was going on we wondered?

It’s the premiere of The Post, a movie starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, apparently they were in there somewhere but I was told by my children to stop staring and move on!

A couple of days later we were off into town again to another show, this time The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie.

The sign outside the theatre

commemorative plaque – note the date….my birthday!!! Although the year is a little out, the play started long before I was a twinkle!

It was a good play, looking a little dated perhaps these days but a typical Agatha Christie whodunnit. Of course, as requested by the cast at the end of the show, we shall not divulge the culprit!

That brought to an end the shows on this visit to London.


Bletchley Park

January 29, 2018

We are now back in New Zealand and after getting over jet lag, the flu, and sorting ourselves out, some of us are now back into the swing of things, although the male member of the touring party has now developed pneumonia so there will be a delay before he feels up to doing his bit. We are so far behind with blog entries and we have some serious catching up to do with our last few weeks of travelling. You can look forward to blogs on lots of museum and library visits, shows we went to see, people we farewelled, and a few days stopover in Singapore before getting home.

Here is the first of the catch up blogs.

Part of our journey was to make a trek to Bletchley Park near Milton Keynes and as we were visiting family up that way it was an opportune time to set aside some time to visit. We had attempted to visit Bletchley on our previous trip to these parts which was thwarted by heavy snow and the roads were blocked, you can read about that trip here

I’m sure most of you will know exactly the history of Bletchley but for those who are unfamiliar Bletchley is where during WWII some of the greatest minds collaborated on breaking codes, inventing machines, techniques and computers to form a major part in the Allies overcoming Hitler, all the while Bletchley was kept very secret even from the partners of those who worked there. You can read more about the Park here on their excellent website. Some of you may be familiar with a couple of movies which were made about some of the work done at the Park, one being Enigma and the other The Imitation Game. As an aside, as Lodge owners we hosted the main actors of Enigma a few years ago.

Back to the visit. We arrived at the Park straight from the train from London before midday and spent the next few hours wandering through the complex until closing time.

the entrance sign

The Park covers around 23ha made up of many buildings including the main mansion house. The huts, as they are known, housed the serious work that went on in code decryption and interception, cipher, and the associated technical machinery invented and modified as part of the intelligence work. As an interesting aside over half of the workers were women.

the mansion where the headquarters were located.

inside the main entrance was this room with its ornate glass ceiling.

The Park has had extensive upgrade over the past few years with displays and interactive modelling set in each of the huts explaining the workings and daily life of the people who worked there. Work went on in these huts intercepting not only German messaging but Russian, Japanese, Italian, Spanish and Portugese languages as well as naval, army, airforce and police intelligence.

decoding equipment

early enigma machine

As well as the small machinery, there is the Bombe, the large machine built to decode the Enigma machine. We managed to arrive at this point in the park when a 45minute talk on the history, the people and workings of the Bombe were carefully explained. As well, a working demonstration of the machine was given. It was totally fascinating.

the reverse side of the Bombe, the computer designed and built by Alan Turing and his team

I later asked how long a modern computer would take to decipher the same code as the Bombe (which took a couple of hours), and was told that it wasn’t until around the year 2000 when dual processors came into being that a modern computer could tackle such a feat.

Our walk around the many huts continued with lots to keep us entertained until closing time when Jackie & Hossein were arriving to collect us.

this sign piqued my interest, where female translators has the title of Lady Translator. I wondered why male translators did not have a similar gender classification?

The following morning Jackie returned us to Bletchley for the morning as we still had plenty to see. I wanted to peruse through a few more of the huts whilst a Roy wanted to visit the National Computing Museum which is also on the premises. This was to see, amongst other things, Colossus, the super computer built and used at the complex. I shall let Roy elaborate on this subject.

Even after having two good goes at seeing everything at Bletchley we could have easily spent at least another day there, and with more work being done on more huts, we look forward to a return visit in the future.


Farewell to a good friend

January 24, 2018

We were utterly heartbroken to hear that our dear friend Marj passed away on 4th January. We send our sincere condolences and much love to her husband and best mate Brian, and to her family. We shall miss her joie de vivre, positive attitude, and for making us laugh.

We first met Brian and Marj when we started our life in the motorhome, in fact we met them on our first week on the road and they were ever so welcoming and helpful, especially on happy hour etiquette. Subsequently we met up with them often and became good friends. We ended up travelling together in a happy convoy of two a number of times. The first time was north to Cape Reinga, another time around the Karikari Peninsular and then we did the trip though the Wairarapa and up through the southern Hawkes Bay where we had lots of fun.

We remember when Marj got pipped at being unable to walk with Brian and refusing to become a “little old lady” so she got herself a bright pink Segway. Then there was no holding her back, off she went everywhere and anywhere. She introduced us to having brunch in a Sunday to remind ourselves what day of the week it was and that other people had to go to work the next day, and to remind ourselves how fortunate we were.

We shall remember her with much fondness and especially her “can do” attitude in the face of adversity.


Family reconnections

January 12, 2018

We had set aside a few days to visit a couple of family members so with trains tickets booked, contact made we set off to make our way north. It was a journey of many links, we took the bus from Alex’s home at just after 8am which then required a relatively short walk to the train station in Erith. The train from Erith to London Bridge takes about 40minutes then a walk from London Bridge station to the underground which took us past Borough Market where we resisted the temptation to visit, after all we were on a schedule! Then it was the tube to Euston station, then another walk to the train station at Euston to catch the train to Bletchley. The train to Bletchley was a short 35 minute trip via fast train, and on arrival we took a taxi to Bletchley Park as we were uncertain as to how far away the station was from the park, it turned out it wasn’t too far and we could have walked. We then spent the next 4-5hrs wandering around Bletchley before being picked up by my cousin Jackie and her husband Hossein. Phew! Most modes of transport covered today; bus, tube, train, taxi, car and shanks’ pony.

NB. A separate blog entry on Bletchley Park will follow.

Jackie is actually my cousin Hilda’s daughter, and tomorrow we would be catching up with Hilda. It can become a little confusing at times as my Mums name is Hilda, and it is on Mums side of the family that we are connected, with my Mum and cousin Hilda’s Mum being sisters. It gets even more confusing as Mum was the 17th of 19 children and Hilda’s mum was number 2, which makes for a lot of cousins as well making the age range in cousins rather extensive.

Back to the original story. Jackie and Hossein live just outside Milton Keynes which is not too far from Bletchley, so we didn’t have too far to travel. They had kindly offered to host us for the night in their lovely home. After lots and lots of chat, it was time for dinner. Hossein had prepared for us an amazing Persian feast, and I mean, a feast.

entree was a selection of delights which were accompanied by Persian bread.

I cannot remember the names of the dishes, but they included yoghurt, salads, herbs, aubergine, cheese, nuts, and spinach prepared in many different ways. There was also the traditional drink Doogh which is a fermented yoghurt drink.

Jackie, Bernice and Hossein

Bernice, Jackie and Roy

Talking and catching up continued through the meal, so much so that none of us remembered to take a picture of the main course, which was an amazing array of dishes including chicken, lamb, two rice dishes one of which included barberries, potatoes, vegetable and herb side dishes all of which were delicious. It must have taken hours of careful preparation for which we were extremely appreciative.

Jackie then presented us with a Persian dessert of cream, cream, rosewater and pistachios. It was very refreshing at the end of the meal, and I did remember to take a picture of that!


After dinner, we relaxed in the lounge and over sweetmeats accompanied by Persian tea we talked and talked until the wee small hours, time for bed – it had been a long day.

The following morning Jackie took Roy and I back to Bletchley so we could finish off what we had not covered the previous day with arrangements made for Jackie to pick us up at 1pm. Then it was back to their place to meet up with Jackie’s sister Dawn who was bringing Ken & Hilda over for a visit.

Back row L-R: Dawn, Jackie, Bernice, Roy with Ken and Hilda in the front.

Cousins Bernice and Hilda

Over lunch and into the late afternoon the talking continued as there was much to catch up on since our last visit in 2010/2011. However, all good things come to an end, and with fond farewells it was time for us to leave.

Jackie took us to Milton Keynes train station where we caught the train to our next destination, Droitwich Spa near Worcester this time a one and a half hour train trip. This trip required just one change in Birmingham, and with times already tight between journeys it was just our luck that our train was delayed just out of Birmingham with signalling problems, it meant we ended up having just 3 minutes to change platforms and trains! However, we made it just as the doors were closing for the final leg of the journey where we were met at the station by Susan.

Sue’s father and my father are cousins which means I’m getting to visit cousins on both sides of the family. We had also met up with Sue and her sister Veronica last time we were here, and as well Sue and her husband Martin had visited us in NZ in 2011.

We headed off to Sue & Martins farmhouse out in the countryside where we were greeted by a lovely warm house and a beautiful dinner. Again we ended up talking and laughing until late, cosy at the table in front of the Aga stove.

The following day I spent reading, as in reading the heap of files of family documents that Sue has which include a pile of letters written by my Mum to Sue’s parents, Sydney and Vera, over the years since the mid 1960’s. As well there were letters from my grandpop and great aunts and uncles, a wealth of information for me to go through and take photos to add to our records. Most of the letters contained an insight into daily life for our family and brought back many memories. Sue also found a stash of photographs that she thought she had lost which included pictures of my great grandmother as well as the rest of the family over the years. There were lots of ooohs and aaahs as I recognised people and places, putting dates and names to some of the unlabelled photographs.

Bernice, Martin and Sue

After another superb meal in the afternoon, it was time for us to head back to London, reversing most of our train travels from the other day.

I have to add here that from both sides of the family, the Womersley and Coatham lines, there is an obvious family propensity to being fantastic cooks that has managed to work its way down through the generations and across the globe.

Our return journey was uneventful and with Alex picking us up from the train station in Erith, we made it back ready to make the most of the week ahead.


Borough market

January 9, 2018

It’s hard to believe that just six months ago the Borough market was the scene of a terrible terrorist attack but here we were at the market which was a hustle of activity and people all happily going about their business. The market is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, in the UK. Borough Market has existed in one form or another for around 1,000 years. Its precise start date is impossible to pin down: there was no official opening, no ribbon-cutting ceremony, not even a brief mention in a chronicle. The best date available, and the one used as the basis for the Market’s millennium celebration, is 1014.

Borough, then as now, was a place defined by its position at one end of London Bridge—for centuries, the only route across the river into the capital. It is likely that London’s first post-Roman bridge was constructed here in the mid-990s, partly to bolster the city’s defences against Viking raiders who routinely sailed up the Thames to kick seven shades of wattle and daub out of the locals.

Borough Market with the Shard in the background.

Amongst the produce on sale are fresh fruit and vegetables, cheese, meat, game, baked bread and pastries, sweet treats, honey, fresh fish & shellfish and much much more.

It’s a place where you can wander around for hours and then go back another day and find even more stalls. Amongst our finds was a stall selling a huge selection of alcohol including rums and gins. Rum selection

Gin selection

And yes, I did have a test of a few samples, purely for research purposes of course although I did buy a London gin for imbibing over the festive season.

All that wandering was making us hungry but what were we to choose? Roy was eyeing up the oyster bar with a choice of varieties of raw oysters from England and Europe served in their shell, or maybe something warming on this chilly day.

a Bellini each to start

so what did Roy choose? It’s hidden under its tinfoil cover.

scallops of course. We did get chatting to a Japanese family who came to share our table, they were enjoying a selection of oysters as each in Japan so they were enjoying the small ones that they got at the market for just a couple of pounds each. I didn’t dare tell them that they are known as the pest of the sea in NZ and people gather them easily.

There has been a running joke in the household that Roy has a bit of a cheese addiction, he buys and tries cheese wherever and whenever there is an opportunity, in fact he has been told he cannot buy anymore cheese until he has finished the pile already stored in the fridge at home!

but what’s this? Caught again in a cheese shop trying a few samples, but he was good…he only bought one!!

It’s a fantastic market and no doubt we shall be back again soon.


London Mithraeum

January 5, 2018


So what is a Mithraeum and why have a look?

In 1952-54 a chance discovery on bomb site revealed a Temple of Mithras.  The temple was carefully recreated in 1962 some distance from the site of the discovery and there it would probably have remained.  in 2010 Bloomberg acquired the site and worked with the City of London and a team of conservation specialists to dismantle and reconstruct the temple, accessible to the public, as close as possible to the original site.  A fuller description of the finds and archaeology is available through the following link 

OK so what or who is Mithras?

The short answer is we know a little but not a lot of detail.  The cult of Mithras was worshipped by the early Romans throughout the Roman Empire.  A number of Mithras Temples have been found throughout the present day countries which were part of the Roman Empire.

The BBC In our Time Series has a programme giving a detailed discussion on the cult.

In Our Time The Cult of Mithras 27 December 2012 available from the BBC

What displayed?

The display within the Bloomberg building is on three levels. 

The first is at street level where there is a short introduction, abstract artwork and a detailed display of some 600 of the 14,000 artefacts discovered on the site gives a representative view of Roman cultural artefacts.  More detail on these is contained in the Archaeology at Bloomberg pdf which can be downloaded from the above link. A few photos follow to give some idea of the artefacts on display.


The abstract artwork depicting a representation of the Thames river in the vicinity of the Temple


On the next level down there is a display of important artefacts from the site that illustrate the rituals and beliefs of the Mithra religion.


Below each of the three artefacts is a display giving more details of the Mithran religion.


Mithras slaying the bull.


Finally the lowest level is the reconstructed Temple.  A little disappointing after the build up, but nonetheless quite interesting.  The level is entered in darkness and then a light and sound show spookily reveals the temple and structure. Unfortunately my camera ran out of power at tis point



Representation of Mithras killing the bull