Unahi, Waipapakauri, Ahipara

Another day of sightseeing around Kaiatai, we headed out to the west coast to Ahipara which is the southern end of Ninety Mile Beach.

20130916-110631.jpglooking to the south and Shipwreck Bay.
After a bit of a drive on the beach, we headed back onto the road to the south end of the bay where we came across the end of a surf rescue competition involving IRB’s (inflatable rescue boats) with teams from around the northern part of NZ.

20130916-110733.jpg looking from the headland northwards over Shipwreck Bay and Ninety Mile Beach

On the foreshore at Ahipara is a carved monument. It is of Poroa, a rangitira chief of Te Rarawa and he was known as a great peacemaker.

20130916-110753.jpgThere is a plaque underneath that says: “This pouwhenua was erected by the people of Te Rarawa to mark our traditional relationship with Te Oneroa a Tohe as guardians of the spiritual and cultural values associated with the spirit pathways handed down by our ancestors for the benefit of us all.”

A visit to the beach at Waipapakauri, which is a few miles along Ninety Mile Beach. There were a number of families fishing or collecting shellfish as far as we could see along the length of the beach.

From here we drove the short distance to the eastern coast to Unahi. Unahi lies at the southern end of Rangaunu Harbour, at the base of the east side of the Aupouri Peninsula and the mouth of the Awanui River.

20130916-110817.jpg the view on arrival, the disused fish processing plant and a boat on dry land.
There were a couple people working on their boats at the wharf and a large commercial fisherman loading up with ice ready to head out for the next week.

20130916-110845.jpg part of the wharf at Unahi

20130916-110857.jpgboats tied at their moorings.

One of the boats, on the far left of the picture, seemed to have a large amount of growth along the side of the deck. On closer inspection…

20130916-110905.jpgcould these be herbs or weeds?

Rangaunu harbour contains about 15% of the mangrove habitat in New Zealand. It is a habitat of international significance for migratory wading birds. Across from the wharf were a large number of wading birds

20130916-110924.jpg
Again on closer inspection, these were a large colony of spoonbills.

20130916-110931.jpg
And on the end of the wharf was this fellow

20130916-110942.jpg

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