Archive for the ‘fishing’ Category

Still here

June 5, 2020

We haven’t moved as we had originally planned. The thinking was that as we move down to Level 2 on the Covid-19 scale, we could move on and start heading north for the winter, NB Southern Hemisphere means moving north for warmer weather whereas our northern hemisphere friends would move south. However, moving down the alert scale also meant that things were returning to some semblance of normality with people returning to work and usual schedules. Hence we seemed to have a flurry of appointments to attend.

In between we had more friends visiting. Helen & Don as well as Wade & Lindsay visited for lunch one day. It was so lovely to have them here and to catch up after being in lockdown. We enjoyed hearing about their lockdown tales, both of them spent lockdown looking after grandchildren, which we were of course very envious of. I’m sure they have created wonderful memories of the strange year that was.

Carol & Glen came to stay in the Self Contained parking area and we enjoyed catching up with them before they headed north. It’s interesting to note how we all enjoyed our unique lockdown experiences, I’m sure we can all take some positives out of 2020.

Roy had a recall to the eye specialist, the upshot being he will be having cataract surgery at the end of the year. It’s not urgent as yet, but best to get onto these things before they become too much of an issue, so December was chosen as the best timing for us.

Roy also has an appointment next week for a repair and replacement to one of his hearing aids, it was scheduled of course for the first week of lockdown but we’ve had to wait until now to get it fitted.

It hasn’t stopped the odd hour or so spent fishing…

An hour of fishing.

We cannot complain about the weather we’ve had all the way through this lockdown period. I’m not sure if it’s because we have all paused for a month or two and had to actually take note of the weather. I’ve always thought that autumn was our most settled patch of weather here in NZ, but this year we had a lovely summer as well and the nice days just rolled into each other for an extended time. It’s starting to get a bit cooler and a bit of rain around now as well which brings to me to our next bit of planning.

We have the van booked in for some maintenance work to be done, actually it’s a major….with the roof being resealed. We had a little bit of a leak develop that Roy seems to have fixed however it seems prudent that we get it sorted properly. That will be in done in just over a week and will take 2 or 3 days so we shall be having a little holiday at Chez Antony.

Moving on down

May 13, 2020

It seems as though most of NZ thought that we were already out of Covid-19 level 3 and had moved to level 2 well before it was happening. Particularly over the last weekend it seemed as though the fine weather gave people a ‘get out of jail’ card and ventured out to the beaches, some travelling quite a distance. We too have ventured to the beach but as it’s just a 150m walk from the van, the beach is well within our local area.

View along the beach on our walk

Although there were a few more people on the beach throughout the weekend, at least during the week we basically have it to ourselves.

We just hope that we do not come out of lockdown too early as we see what has happened overseas with a resurgence of the virus. We can only hope that people are still sensible.

Last week I had my flu jab, Roy had his a few weeks ago at our Doctors. I was scheduled to have it done at the same time after I had my PICC line removed but my appointment times overran each other which meant that I missed out, instead I had it done last week at the local pharmacy. The appointment was made, I was told not to get out of the car as they would administer the vaccine whilst I remained in the car and was vaccinated through the opened window. Easy as.

We also ventured out in the van to fill up with LPG as we have a large built in tank which fuels our fridge, cooker and hot water. It’s about 30kms to the nearest fuel station that also has auto LPG, but it didn’t take us long to get there and return back to our parking spot. Parking at a slightly different angle than previously to make sure we get as much sun as possible for our solar power.

Parked in the sun

This week we have tried our luck fishing off the beach. Now of course the problem was how to get the fishing line out to a reasonable distance off shore. The wind was blowing the wrong way for the kite, our drone compatriots are locked down elsewhere in the country, so what are we to do? Kayak fishing is not allowed in level 3 of lockdown but fishing is now allowed, as is kayaking…..hmmmm, put the thinking cap on. Bruce to the rescue, he came with his kayak, dragged the end of our line 300m off shore, dropped it off and came back to shore and left us to wait.

A little dot somewhere out there on the water is Bruce in the kayak

And what do you know? It worked! 7 snapper caught the first day, but only one was kept, even though some of the others were of legal size (just), we sent them back into the ocean to grow a little more. The following day we had another go with this time two very nice fish kept and a further four returned to swim again.

A couple of nice fish

Yum, fresh fish for dinner. And if you are wondering, the platter that the fish are sitting on is 60cm in length, so both good sized fish.

Thursday (tomorrow) is the day we change to level 2 rules, I think we will shy away from the shops until the excitement/madness wears off.  It’s all very well having all this spare time locked down but you need supplies to do all those things you’ve been meaning to do.  I must say that the hardware store and the wool shop will be on my must visit list as soon as possible.

We still have to remain careful so remember to wash your hands, keep your social distance, wear a mask, wash your hands and wash your hands.

Uretiti and a birthday

November 30, 2019

It’s just an hour and a half drive from Kerikeri to Uretiti and we were on our way in good time. The roads were very busy and we also noted that the roads in general were very bumpy, as items that usually stay in place as we travel were tossed off their perch as we meandered along the road, however, we arrived in good time to get our favourite spot at Uretiti.

Parked up, but where are Keith & Deb?

There they are, hidden by the trees.

Someone (the younger member of the touring party) was having a birthday so with that in mind we headed to McLeods Brewery & Pizza Barn in Waipu to meet up with a couple of friends for dinner. Jacky & Chris came over from Whakapirau, Mark (who shares a birthday with me) & Glynis came from Ruakaka and of course there was Keith & Deb along with Roy and I making up the party. And in my usual manner I was too busy chatting and catching up to even think about a photo but it was a lovely evening.

The following morning the fellows were up early (5am) to head down to the beach for a fish over the morning change of light.

Keith’s catch

Roy caught three snapper as well but to add to his species collection he also caught these two.

Gurnard and mackerel

The gurnard was had for dinner and the mackerel became bait.

The fishing bug was back so another 5am start saw them back on the beach the following morning, again with good success

Keith’s collection

And Roy also had a good catch,also increasing his species catch

Snapper and a starfish

The starfish had eaten the bait completely and was well and truly hooked, however it was soon released back into the sea to live another day.

Encouraged by the catches they also decided to head out for a fish over the evening change of light with great success.

Meanwhile Roy & I went into Whangarei to catch up with Gayle, whom we originally met on our very first summer in our van on the shores of Lake Dunstan near Cromwell a few years ago now. And we subsequently have met up over the years, tripped around together and generally stayed in touch.

The selfies are getting better!!

We had a lovely time catching up over lunch before we all headed off in our separate directions, until next time.

Then it was back to meet up with Mark & Glynis as they were joining us for drinks, however I again forgot to take any photos but we had a lovely time chatting over drinks and nibbles before they headed on home. Not long after that we were joined by Gary & Marg as they were coming to watch us have our last fish off the beach before we left.

Getting ready to send out the drone

Marg, Gary and Roy waiting patiently

And another successful fish it was with a couple of beauties landed which we sent off with Gary & Marg for them to consume.

Keith 8lb beauty

Roys 11lb specimen – apologies for the terrible photo quality, it was late, dark and getting cold!

Our last few days at Uretiti were fishing heaven, with the freezer full again, it’s time to move on.

Oh and just so you don’t miss out, here’s the latest Callum picture….already showing good signs of a love of books.

Callum reading

Moving on

November 26, 2019

All good things must come to an end as it was time to leave Rarawa; the lovely beach, the fishing, the relaxation….but needs must.

Leaving the white silica sands of Rarawa Beach, until next year!

Before we left and went our separate ways we all had a final brunch together in the glorious morning sun.

L-R: Keith, Deb, Roy, Bernice, Glen with Carol taking the photo

The exit gate at the camp was potentially a little tricky to exit as there is a large ditch either side of the entrance which was eroding away making the entrance narrower. In the days prior to our leaving, a car had crashed into the ditch, it had been retrieved out of the ditch but left on the side of the road right by the entrance. I went ahead of Roy to see him out of the gate safely and we would hook the car on the back after he had exited.

Sign at the entrance

The entrance and road in to the camp

It was actually an easy exit but as we have a long wheel base it’s always best to check. Safely hooked up we ventured into Kaitaia to dump the tanks, fill with gas and water before spending the night at the RSA. The next morning we were off again, we weren’t going too far though, just to the NZMCA park at a Tokerau beach for a couple of days. Glen & Carol were heading off to Matai Bay for a couple of weeks whereas we are now slowly working our way back down to Shakespear for our summer stint there.

And of course whilst at Tokerau, we just had to have a last fish, some good snapper were caught and as well Roy caught a good sized Kahawai to add to his varied species collection.

Roy with his Kahawai

This was smoked and became a lovely smoked fish pie for us to share.

We had just a few days at Tokerau Beach, visiting friends and generally catching our breath. We visited Jim at Ramp Road which is not too far away, and a very popular spot these days. We have stayed there in the past but these days prefer other options.

We were soon underway again after a few days, this time just as far as Kerikeri. We had planned to be at Kerikeri for a Saturday morning so we could all visit the very good market that is on every week. Our favourite German bread maker is there (hi Peter) and we love trying out new things that always seem to be on offer at the market.

Roy also managed to catch up with his cousin Stuart whilst we were in Kerikeri and we generally added to the locally economy through one thing or another, as we usually do. Soon it was time to farewell Kerikeri and head further south, the weather is glorious, summer is definitely on its way.

Rarawa part two

November 17, 2019

Fishing, fishing and more fishing, that’s how most days pan out, although it’s not just snapper we’ve been catching.

Left; Maori Chief (yes, that is it’s name), top right; Porae, bottom right; Trevally & Porae

And many thanx to my brother John for quickly identifying the fish we had never caught before i.e. Maori Chief and the Porae. I sent him a picture of each fish when they were caught and within minutes we had the reply and full answer. The Maori chief was returned to the sea to live another day as he is not good to eat whilst the Porae was filleted then the fillets were baked on the BBQ, a lovely eating fish it was too. Thanx John for your great knowledge and prompt responses.

But don’t be deceived, some very good snapper have also been caught.

Snapper or two

And that’s not to say there hasn’t been the odd line broken and lost nor a tangle or two to undo.

Some of you may have seen on the news that a Manta Ray was washed up on Rarawa Beach this week. It’s a very unusual occurrence, in fact it’s the first time that a Manta Ray has been washed up on a beach in NZ.

Glen lying in front of the ray to give you some idea of its size.

According to news reports it was over 4m across, very impressive and so pleased that we didn’t come across that in the water when swimming! A day or so later Roy found its liver on the beach after it had been autopsied by scientists, the liver alone measuring in at over 1.5m…and I’ve refrained from posting a picture of that for the sake of decency, you can thank me later. And I also declined Roy’s kind offer of bringing it back to cook up for liver and bacon breakfast🤢.

We’ve also been busy with adding little bits and pieces to the van, even after 8 1/2 years on the road we are still tweaking things. Parcels were delivered to the Kaitaia Post office where we collected them during the week.

First was a replacement fan blade for the bathroom, as after I cleaned the old fan most of the blades broke off. I blame our strong UV light here in NZ for the deterioration of the plastic.

New fan blades

We also got some covers for the wheels, again to protect them from the fierce NZ sun when we are parked up for any length of time.

Wheel covers

Next was some hardware for the flyscreen door, first a spring which when mounted automatically shuts the door once opened, which saves me having to remind Roy to shut the screen door behind him! The kit came with two springs to attach but after installing the one, the door snaps shut so quickly and ferociously we decided that one was enough. The Second item is a bar style handle which fits across the door, this will save people pushing on the screen material which eventually will tear over time plus it adds strength to the door .

Left, screen door bar handle, top right inside view, bottom right spring loaded door

Then there are the new rain gutter spouts, over the years we have made our own versions of thesewhich have served us well but it was time to get some proper ones.

Rain gutter spouts

I also bought a set of hangers that slide into the awning rail so I can hang my lights up at Christmas, it will make it so easy to hang the lights along the rollout awning rail without too much fuss or bother.

Hangers

And there has been some other major upgrades with some new 12v outlet points located into either side of the rear lockers. This is so we can power a bilge pump that we use to pump rain water that we catch into our tank. Previously we have run the wire in through a bedroom window which meant having to remove the insect screen from the window and to then have one of us always at the ready to plug/unplug it in to control the power. Modifications have been made and the pump is now firmly and permanently mounted at the bottom of a bucket with hose adaptors placed on the outside of the bucket to connect either a hose into the water tank or to use it with a shower attachment for use in a shower tent when appropriate. An on/off switch has also been installed which makes it so much easier to use.

Keith and Roy rewiring the pump

Oh and then there is the new 12v LED strip lighting that Keith gave to us which we have installed along the length of top of the slideout. It’s given us lovely ambient lighting inside the lounge area in the evenings without the glare of overhead lights.

We are constantly fine tuning things and as time goes by with new technologies and access to information, ideas and hardware becomes readily accessible there are always tweaks to be made to make life a little more pleasant.

Oh, we haven’t finished with Rarawa yet, part three is on its way!

Rarawa part one

November 6, 2019

Nearly caught up!

We’ve been coming to Rarawa now for a good many years, and we still never tire of the place. We’ve been here on our own and with various friends over the years making each visit memorable for one reason or another.

The route

We’ve set up camp in every part of the park, never parking in the same place twice, and this time is no exception, although we did move after a couple of days to hunker behind the flax to give us some protection from the cold southerly winds.

Three in a row and one across

We are on the right, Keith & Deb further along and Jim furtherest away with Carol & Glen facing toward the camera. Jim arrived a day or two after we had set ourselves up otherwise we may have set ourselves up slightly differently. But after a couple of days parked where we were initially parked, Jim too moved to be in the spot nearest the camera. Now we are perfectly fine and sheltered from most winds.

Set up in comfort

The fishing off the beach has also been very fruitful, with again Roy showing the others how to catch fish successfully! Something he has been reminded of frequently, all in good humour of course.

Keith taking out Roys line

I haven’t many pictures of the fish caught, I’m too busy helping to haul them all in to have time to take pictures.

The largest snapper (top) was 11lbs.

Besides, by the time they are ready to bring in the lines I am usually soaked after being in the tide collecting tuatuas. The fish go straight into the chilly bin packed with salt ice to keep the fish nice and cool ready to be filleted after a few hours of chilling, or even overnight, which them makes them much easier and nicer to fillet.

As I mentioned previously we have collected tuatuas. Tuatua (for our foreign readers) and according to Wikipedia are Paphies subtriangulata a species of edible bivalve clam known as tuatua in the Maori language, and are endemic to New Zealand. It is found on all three of the main New Zealand islands, buried in fine clean sand on ocean beaches.

The large shell is asymmetrical, with the hinge at one side. Its closest relative, the pipi, has a symmetrical shell.

Tuatua

If we go at low tide then you can pick them in shallow water, but with waves rolling in and splashing over me as I’m bent down scratching around in the sand for the shellfish, I usually come out fairly well soaked. The latest effort had me being completely bowled by the surf ending up either on my knees or on my bum, a sight greeted with much hilarity by all. Roy wasn’t immune, he too got bowled, and lost his grip on his shorts, mooning onlookers. But I did win the wet t shirt competition!!!

Ready to be shelled

After collecting them, we leave them in a bucket of clean sea water over night so that the shellfish purge themselves of any sand, then open them the next day with a blunt edged knife to prise open the shells. Some people steam them open, but I prefer to open them with a knife so they don’t get cooked twice. A slow process but many hands make light work as we sit around the bucket opening the shells and chatting away.

Job done

I then chop up the tuatua to make into fritters, and use very little else to make up the fritters apart from egg and just a tablespoon or two of flour to bind them, plus a few other flavour enhancing ingredients. Delicious.

Tuatua fritters

It’s not all plain sailing though, line has been broken off and sometimes it comes in tangled, usually when an eel has been caught.

Roy and Keith untangle a line

There have been some stunningly beautiful days, with the weather finally coming right. The evenings have been lovely for fishing the change of light, I have to admit I haven’t dragged myself out of bed to accompany the guys on their early morning forays.

Fishing the evening change of light

And the freshest have been especially good …..for some!

Nice one ROy

A bit heavy are they?

Yes, I think he measures up!

Tokerau Beach

October 30, 2019

(Still in catch up mode….).

We finally left Uretiti heading towards Kerikeri and the NZMCA parking site for a couple of nights to hunker down, out of the way of an impending storm that was forecast.

Apparently we missed most of the storm but we heard from others who were still at Uretiti that they suffered 100km/hr winds and terrible driving rain, and it wasn’t very pleasant at all but much better than the snow, wind and rain that we saw the rest of the country was suffering. Spring weather at its finest showing its true self.

The ground at Kerikeri was very very boggy with most of the site cordoned off and reduced to a small area that had scoria laid down, even then we sank into the ground a bit. We can report that we had no leaks through our roof so we can presume that it had been well and truly fixed.

Roy also got a chance to have a catch-up with his cousin Stuart to discuss genealogical matters and other projects going on in their respective lives. As well, we lined the pockets of a number of establishments in and around Kerikeri stocking up the larders, getting a few maintenance matters sorted, buying wool for this grandma to knit up, and some of the touring party apparently visited the chocolate shop (I resisted 😇), as well as numerous other sundry items were purchased.

After a couple of nights ‘enjoying’ the very wet ground at Kerikeri, we were soon on our way again heading further north, this time to Tokerau Beach, and the NZMCA parking area.

It wasn’t long before the blokes decided it was time to have a fish, and for Roy to perfect his method of launching his baits and line with Keith’s drone.

Glen launching his drone next to Keith’s

Keith launching his drone and line

Now for some reason I did not take many pictures of the fish caught, but suffice to say over the four or five days, quite a number of fish were caught, processed, eaten and many vacuum packed and frozen.

Roys first catch

A good start

Roy was gaining a bit of a reputation of catching the largest fish each time they went out, and he was not allowed to forget it either!!

A couple of trips into Kaitaia for laundry and shopping were done whilst we were here. My vacuum sealer finally gave out after many years of good use (it would vacuum but not seal) so a trip into the shops to buy a new one was in order.

Food vacuum sealer

The freezer is getting nicely full of fish for us to enjoy over the summer months when we are parked up camp hosting at Shakespear. As well, lots of fish is being eaten, from whole fish, to fillets cooked every which way, to curries and the like.

Fish fish fish

We have our favourite dishes that we regularly come back to, after trying many many recipes. Sometimes the simplest is the best especially for such fresh fish.

Deb had a birthday whilst we were here, Keith cooked dinner of crumbed Weiner Schnitzel with a cauliflower mash, salads and veg which was all very good and I made a dessert of lime pannacotta with citrus salad and passionfruit.

Dessert

We do eat very well.

Time to leave here and head further north whilst the weather is reasonable, again we are picking our days to travel as with another bit of windy weather due, we make the most of calmer days.

The fish called and we answered

October 18, 2019

Contrary to some cheeky comments by those at Shakespear, we did leave the park as planned after a week of R&R. Don’t ask us what we did when we were there as I’m not really sure, apart from making lots of tea and coffee for friends and acquaintances we caught up with over the week.

We did make the final adjustments to our table, making a nice mounting plate and putting it in place. However, after a couple of days of using the table and looking at it, we came to the conclusion it wasn’t quite right. So the backing plate and mount was moved about a cm so it could be firmly fixed in place (it had a bit of a wobble), and we also had to adjust the angle of the table top as we realised that rather than being level by using a spirit level, it should really be parallel with the floor. Anyway, it’s all done now and it works well for us. Now we just have to find someone to make the table top we want.

So we left Shakespear and headed on out of town. But first a bit of a circuitous route as we first headed north to Hatfield’s Beach to the dump station and then back south to Dairy Flat to the fuel station to top up with LPG and fuel before hitting the motorway north to Uretiti Beach.

The route

We were soon parked up at Uretiti settling ourselves in for a few days. we are again with friends Keith & Deb as well as their friends Glen & Carol. We hadn’t been there long before it was decided that our first fish for the season would be a good idea. Particularly as Roy has a new system for fishing that includes a rod with electric reel, it was time to see if it all works and to do a bit of a test run.

All geared up.

The drone took the line out, and it all worked perfectly well. Glen had his drone and line out as well and then Keith put out his line.

Meanwhile back at the van, I received a text to say you had better come down to the beach as it looks like we have all caught fish. Deb & I went down to help bring in the haul. But hang on, this is getting very hard to bring in the lines, what is going on? It soon became evident we had something very big on the line, and sure enough we did……somebody’s torpedo had drifted along the beach and collected all three lines. Now all our lines are braid which means they are very thin, easily tangled…what a mess. Grrrr. With infinite patience, the lines were eventually detangled, the torpedo dragged onto the beach, however it’s line was cut a few times to detangle from the mess. Eventually it was all done, Roy had two beautiful big fish, Keith had three and Glen had five but he had to return two to the sea as they were a little small. And there were no fish on the torpedo line to make up for the shambles, plus there was no sight of the torpedo owner either. We shall try the phone number marked on its side.

Nice snapper there Roy

Guess what was on the menu for dinner?

Not to be deterred from having another go, they all went again the following night, again returning with a few fish each.

We had a lovely few days at Uretiti, managing also to catch up with Mark & Glynis one morning for brunch at the Waipu Golf Club. But all good things come to an end, as it is definitely time to move north, especially before the forecast bad weather due in the next day or so.

Moving on….

March 10, 2019

We are very good at changing our plans. Initially we had intended to move on from Shakespear a week ago on Sunday BUT we heard from Gary & Marg that they were coming down to Red Beach to look after their grandkids so we thought we would delay our departure for a few days and take the opportunity to catch up with them before we head out of town.

Meanwhile we are trying to get a few jobs done that we have managed to put off until now….isn’t that always the way, put off the inevitable until we have to do it!!

Our last weekend was a very busy weekend again with campers, with some lovely lovely people in. Some even shared their spoils…

yes, we had fresh fish for dinner that evening.

Inevitably it was time to bid farewell to everyone at Shakespear, after a lovely farewell from the Rangers and some other volunteers we finally headed out of the park on Thursday. But we weren’t going too far as we still had a few chores to get done. So via the LPG filing station at Dairy Flat where, when a truck pulled out from in front of us revealed this special pairing.

I have no idea what it is exactly but obviously it stands upright as there are hydraulic rams on the side near the base. I couldn’t ask the driver either as he was out of there a moment after I had taken the picture.

We headed off to South Auckland heading first to the dump station at Bruce Pullman Park in Papakura. Then it was off to the friendly fellows at VTNZ in Takanini for a COF where we had to wait in line for some time before we had our turn. By this time it was lunch time and time for a cuppa and a bite to eat whilst we waited. We soon had our COF and it was back to the dump station. Why return to the dump station? Because we had half filled the black and grey water tanks with fresh water to slosh around whilst we drive around which helps clean them out a bit, especially required after sitting for so long in one place they needed a good clean out. That all done it was off to a busy Ardmore to park up for a few days.

I had forgotten what it is like to park in a place with other vehicles so close to you, as well as parking on gravel. Give me grass any day but needs must. We are here for a week as we have booked the van in to have the underneath sealed next week, a necessary maintenance job to prevent any rust on the chassis as we so often park near salt laden sea air.

Our son Antony lives just around the corner from Ardmore so it is also a good opportunity to catch up with him, oh and utilise his cooking facilities.

It’s that time of the year again, pickling and preserving time, and first on the list was to make some sauce and soup.

two pots on the boil

And the resulting spoils

Along with the plum sauce I made a few weeks ago, the store cupboard is becoming full again. That should keep us going for some time.

Moving, fishing and a yacht

November 11, 2018

A night in Kerikeri on our way back towards Auckland meant that Roy could have a good catch up with Stuart to compare and swap genealogy notes. Whilst Roy was out, I noticed another vehicle in the Kerikeri NZMCA Park that looked familiar so I wandered along to meet up with Shellie. Shellie blogs and photographs her and David’s travels around New Zealand, her blog is here. Over a cuppa we talked for a good couple of hours about everything and nothing. Thanx for the catch up Shellie, sorry we didn’t get to say hooray, but enjoy your travels north, until next time.

Our next stop is Uretiti where Keith & Deb had arrived the day before us and sorted out a great position for themselves. We set ourselves up in a lovely spot just along from our usual position, which just so happened to be taken. However, I think I’ve just found our new favourite space!

Settled in

perfect positioning for the sun and privacy.

and another vehicle parked in our usual spot behind the tree.

We were settled into relax mode when the guys decided they might just try a fish off the beach after dinner. They were only away just over an hour before they were back with one rather large fish and another couple of good sized ones. They also thought it may be a good idea to have an early morning fish whilst some of us slumbered on, They did bring back another three for their early morning effort.

Lunch time they went for another fish, this time I wandered down to the beach with them. Whilst there, looking out to sea with the backdrop of the Hen & Chicken Islands was a very large yacht, which was moving very swiftly, along with four chase boats and at one stage a helicopter in tow.

Click on the picture to enlarge and on the left hand side of the island you should be able to pick out the sail and a splash of water from one of the chase boasts. Sorry, but only had my phone with me to take a picture.

We soon determined that this was one of the Russell Coutts/Larry Ellison catamarans on trial for their new racing competition set to rival the Americas Cup. It is a sailing league called SailGP that will be contested in an enhanced class of foiling 50-foot catamarans. Teams from the United States, Australia, Great Britain, France, Japan and China will compete starting in 2019 in highly advanced catamarans called F50s.

Gayle came to visit for a day, we met when we first hit the road, it was fabulous to catch up again and have a few laughs.